Oldham County Day #ThursdayDoors

Last Saturday, Per Bastet Publications took part in Oldham County Day in LaGrange, Kentucky. Since I’ve developed a strong tendency to sunstroke, we couldn’t set up on the square, but we were among the pampered few who had tables inside at Karen’s Book Barn.

Last year, Karen’s Book Barn was under different management and up for sale. Before our dazzled eyes, we witnessed three of our favorite people whispering and giggling conferring. We later learned that those folks, Tony Acree, Frank Hall (former owner of That Book Place in Madison, Indiana), and Lynn Tincher (who has since bowed out of ownership due to lack of time to devote to that business rather than writing), bought it!

ANYWAY, there we were. I had parked way the hell around the corner and down the street, which gave me the chance to snap some doors on the way back.

I found myself right next to a Famous House!

Two doors for one! What IS it with these old houses with their Doors To Nowhere? Does anybody know?

LaGrange has a railroad right down the middle of main street. The town has turned this kiosk to good use.

Across the street, this house.

On the corner, this building. The huge metal flower SHINES in the sunlight.

Karen’s Book Barn was a Masonic building, and may still be owned by the Masons, for all I know.

Here’s the door on the side, which announces the Rob Morris Scottish Rite chapter.

So there was a parade, and I snapped this picture. I always think of my grandfather when I see these vehicles. Married and with a child, he never left the states, but they still do.

They collect and restore old jeeps. What’s the name of their club?

If you don’t know Kilroy, here’s about Kilroy.

One of Tony Acree’s young daughters received an invitation to paint a sidewalk square — quite an honor.

Like wildflowers, you must allow yourself to grow in all the places people thought you never would.

OF COURSE I had to take pictures of the train for all you railheads out there. Because trains.

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Finally, I couldn’t leave without a snappie of this ghost window. I do love ghost windows and doors.

Thursday Doors is a celebration hosted by Norm Frampton, photographer extraordinaire. Go to his site, dig his photos, click on the blue frog link, and stroll among the doors of the world.

A WRITING PROMPT FOR YOU: A character goes to a civic festival and sees a ghost, literal or figurative.

MA

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About

I was born in Louisville, Kentucky, but now live in the woods in southern Indiana. Though I only write fiction, I love to read non-fiction. The more I learn about this world, the more fantastic I see it is.

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One thought on “Oldham County Day #ThursdayDoors

  1. Tony Acree
    Twitter:

    July 20, 2017 at 8:20am

    We loved having you and the “gals” at Karen’s. It has become and Oldham County Day tradition like none other.

    Permalink  ⋅ Reply
    • Author
  2. Vicky

    July 20, 2017 at 2:02pm

    What a fun trip you must have had, thanks for sharing, I enjoyed it too! Some nice in character doors but my favorite has to be the totally out of place metal flower, which somehow fits into the world in LaGrange!!

    Permalink  ⋅ Reply
  3. Pete

    July 20, 2017 at 2:05pm

    A lot of those old houses have a fake door on the 2nd floor. This is because there was originally intended to be a porch or a balcony there. Often, the things were planned, but not built on. Or were originally there, then taken down. And now all we see is the closed door. Often, part of the original idea was to be for a fire escape.

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  4. dan antion
    Twitter:

    July 20, 2017 at 7:08pm

    You got some great doors in here. And a train – you got a train! I like ghost windows and doors going nowhere,

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