Tipper And The Snow Cats #Caturday #TipperAndChickie

Hi, there! I’m Tipper Allen, and guess what?

It snowed here, and there was lots of it! Momma told me, “Look outside! It’s a snow tiger!” So I looked, but it was just #4 Hooman Sister in a funny hat.

#4 went home and sent Momma this picture of a snow kitty she made in her front yard.

But Momma said I was the only snow kitty she wants in her lap.

That’s such a lucky thing! ‘Cause that’s where I want to be.

A WRITING PROMPT FOR ANIMALS: Would you rather be inside or outside?

TA

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One thought on “Tipper And The Snow Cats #Caturday #TipperAndChickie

  1. joey

    February 27, 2021 at 10:56am

    Tipper is way cuter than snow kitty, and snow kitty is so, so cute!

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    • Marian Allen

      February 28, 2021 at 3:46pm

      Not ever? Not anywhere? There are no mountains you can go to the top of to make snowpeople? You have to come and see some snow sometime. It sparkles in the sun like piles of crystal.

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  2. acflory

    February 28, 2021 at 4:50pm

    Kitty cuddles are the best sleeping tablet known to woman. You’re a very good cuddler, Tipper.
    p.s. it doesn’t snow in 99.9% of Australia either. We do get some snow up on the ranges, but our sky resorts [sic] usually have to make snow.

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    • Marian Allen

      March 1, 2021 at 7:45am

      Snow is cold and wet and much nicer to look at than to feel sliding down the back of your neck. Or getting over the tops of your boots and soaking into your socks. But it’s VERY nice to look at.

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      • acflory

        March 1, 2021 at 6:02pm

        lol – yes, yes and no! To my eyes, snow is simply monochromatic and I’ve grown up being surrounded by colour for most of my life. I don’t find snow ‘beautiful’. Then again, I find the dry brown grass of our summers and the bluey-greeney-grey of our gum trees beautiful in a way you probably wouldn’t.
        I think that wanting beauty is innate, but what we consider to be beauty is very much a learned response.

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        • Marian Allen

          March 2, 2021 at 7:57am

          Not to argue, and I do endorse your final statement, but snow is glittery and the shadows of things make wonderful patterns on it. But, as you say, years of exposure to a certain kind of beauty would undoubtedly sensitize the eyes to the subtleties of it. 🙂

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          • acflory

            March 3, 2021 at 12:33am

            Yeah, conditioning really is powerful. When I was in my early twenties, I spent a year in Europe, and while I found the landscapes utterly beautiful – so green, so lush, so colourful – after a while I started to feel a nostalgia that was almost visceral. I longed for our big, big sky and the dusty green of eucalypts and the lack of ‘stuff’. Once you’re out in the country here, your eye can travel forever without getting caught on a man-made structure. Over there, everything was small scale. So much so that I began to feel almost claustrophobic. -shrug- Our Indigenous people talk about love of country, the physical place as well as all it represents. After I returned home, I sort of knew what they meant.

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            • Marian Allen

              March 3, 2021 at 8:48am

              I hear that. In southern Indiana, the landscape looks a lot like the landscape of England: all rucked up from the advancing glaciers and from the debris they left behind when they retreated. Northern Indiana is flatter, and out west is flatter, still. We drove out to South Dakota one summer, and the prairie was probably something like what you describe. It was SO BEAUTIFUL! But I felt embraced, when we got back to where we were snuggled by hills and trees. 🙂

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              • acflory

                March 3, 2021 at 4:56pm

                I think there’s ‘home’ and then there’s ‘my country’ kind of thing coz while I love the wide open spaces, my home is nestled in hills and trees as well.

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